7 reasons you’re not improving in competitive video games

It’s not a secret that gaming in 2020 is one of the hottest hobbies, and improving in competitive video games one of the most widely searched topics on the internet.

We’re not sure whether the drastic surge in interest is because of the global pandemic, or people finally started realizing how cozy and cool playing games. In the end, it doesn’t even matter what the cause is, we’re just happy that it’s happening. What matters is that gaming is finally getting the recognition it deserves, along with the professional eSport scene.

It’s only a matter of time before the same amounts of money involved in regular sports are transferred to the gaming industry and the world of video-game competition. With some of the most popular sports organizations investing in the gaming sphere, our hopes can only skyrocket now more than ever. It’s a great sign, I won’t hold back from saying that.

So, the competition in video games is pretty huge these days, especially in countries where people religiously play titles such as League of Legends, Valorant, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and DotA 2. And, we all know what increased competition means. It’s obviously more difficult to progress in the ranks when you have naturally gifted prodigies dominating each and everyone they face on the virtual battlefield.

You as a casual player probably don’t have the will to go pro, but you still want to improve at least a bit and move up higher in the ranks in the games you play competitively. If you’ve recently noticed that your progress is stagnating, these seven reasons might be the cause for your slow or no progress at all. Let’s take a look.

1. Improving in competitive video games is not possible without enough training

If you take a look at the routine of any professional player you’ll understand that you’re not even close to their skill level because your routine looks nothing like that, if you even have a routine. Playing competitively and improving in the game requires a well-structured training routine that affects your mechanics, game sense, and the overall mindset. Just like everything else in life, if you want to improve something, you have to train.

2. Playing while in a bad mood

Everyone can have a bad day, and although most of us think that video games are what’s supposed to relax us after something negative happens, it can often lead to a lot of tilting and a hot-headed attitude in-game. If you are playing to improve or to climb up the ladder, we suggest that you avoid playing while in a bad mood. You need your thoughts clear and your mind sharp in order to win.

3. Improving in competitive video games is difficult without the proper equipment

Titles such as Counter-Strike or Valorant require a lot of equipment if you want to be really good at them. Sadly, precision is the most important factor in first-person shooters, so the sensor in your mouse and the refresh rate of your monitor really make a huge difference. Not that you cannot play well on an average setup, but it’s always a disadvantage when you face someone with top-tier equipment. Investing in a proper setup is what I personally advise you to do if you feel like that’s what’s limiting your skill. But, don’t get into the mindset that equipment is the only important thing.

4. Not taking the game seriously

It’s fine not to take the game seriously when you want to remain a casual player. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. But, as I said above, playing casually and playing competitively are two entirely different worlds, and once you step into the competitive waters, there’s no place to be “a casual” anymore. If you don’t take the game seriously, you won’t improve, end of the story.

5. Improving in competitive video games is difficult without the proper teammates

It’s a bad habit to always blame your team for whatever happens in-game, but sometimes they can really be the deciding factor that drags you down in your games. Since every single one of the games I mentioned in this article are competitive 5v5 titles, your teammates really play a huge role in the final outcome. Whether you win or lose can sometimes solely depend on their performance. Spending some time to find the perfect teammates is not a bad idea at all. But, upon finding a team in which the chemistry is perfect, improving in competitive video games will suddenly become a lot easier.

6. Your voice comms are not on-point

Voice comms are what every beginner player underestimates in almost every competitive title. It’s only after thousands of hours that people start to understand yelling in the microphone or not being clear about what you see in-game is a very, very important factor. A great way to improve in this field is by hearing how professional teams communicate when playing important matches. You can find such content on YouTube or on any other platform dedicated to gaming and esports.  

7. You play while tired

Last but not least, it’s a well-known fact that people perform worse when tired, and this applies to every field of life, especially gaming. You see, in titles were blinking an eye is a huge risk, you cannot really allow yourself to play with drastically reduced reaction times. In the world of gaming, one second can decide who the winner will be. Avoid playing while tired, even if you are casually playing. Keep this for singleplayer games where your performance doesn’t affect anyone else. Remember that you can be the “bad teammate” as well, so don’t play unless your mind is ready for the challenge.

Conclusion

Playing casually and playing competitively are two entirely different worlds. Whenever you think that you’re trying the hardest, remember that there’s someone training more than you and putting twice as many hours into the game. If you want to improve, make sure that you don’t do any of the mistakes we listed above. I hope to see you on the battlefield in the near future.